Hustle: How to Run a Business When You Have a Full-Time Job

By Milly Hailstone

First of all, my head is constantly filled with new ideas that I have: denim jacket designs, how to triple my website traffic, should I start tweeting? etc. I guess that's why I had to quit coffee - my brain accelerates at 5th gear most of the time. It's a whirlwind in there. 

 

Other than that, I eat, sleep, and breathe Straight Talk BN1. I have to - otherwise, it wouldn't be worth doing. If you're reading this article, considering starting your own venture, you need to know that it's hard work.

BUT, it's totally worth it! And, I think that you that NEED to do it. How else can you escape the dull cycle or work, eat, sleep, repeat? 

Me in action. Photo by Andrzej Dyjak. 

Me in action. Photo by Andrzej Dyjak. 

 

Don't settle for a 9-5 job. Open up yourself to new opportunities, and in doing so your life and salary can become limitless. Stop being a slave for £7 an hour. 

 

If I'm not constantly bettering myself or working towards a goal I start to spiral out of control. I'm not content to watch my life pass by working a job I dislike that pays a low wage. I crave excitement, adventure and to create. 

 

I'm a list maker, and currently, all my thoughts are organised in a small blue notebook. Said notebook stays by my side, otherwise, anxiety creeps up. What if I think of an awesome idea and can't write it down? The horror. 

 

So, what is it like to work full-time and run a business? In a word, busy. My first brain chatterings in the morning revolve around BN1, as do my last thoughts at night

 

Anyway, here are some tips on finding extra time during the day. 

 

1. GET ORGANIZED

If, like me, you need to plan out your time to get stuff done, find yourself a trusty blue notebook or a diary. You can plan your time, up to the hour. 

 

2. QUIT NETFLIX

Ah, the quickest way to pass time. 

If you're partial to occasional (or daily) binge-watching you need to unsubscribe from Netflix if you want to get anything done. I initially lied to myself, saying that I'd still do plenty of work with Netflix on the in the background. But, in my humble opinion, there's something about How to Get Away with Murder that kills the creative drive. 

 

3. SLEEP WELL

After a solid 9-hour kip I can do 3 things at once. I'm serious, if you get good nights sleep you are going to be able to juggle your 9-5 and your new venture a lot better. Instead of staying up to 3 am doing mediocre work in a tired state, get a full 8-hours. Or, even take an afternoon nap if you need a little energy boost. 

I think a lot of energy comes from excitement and passion. That's why it's so important to do something you love, otherwise, you'll find it hard to get motivated. You've got to ask yourself, would I happily wake up at 5 am to work on this? If the answer is yes, you've found your passion. 

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4. DON'T GIVE YOURSELF TOO MUCH TO DO

I'm classic for making this mistake. If it's the weekend, I'll pack my to-do list with a ton of ideas and things that I need to do. But, by Sunday night I've not completed half of them. Then, I'm hit with guilt and feel disappointed with myself, which in turn, makes me less productive. This is so silly, as I should be celebrating all the things I did tick off. So, I'd say you should start with 2 or 3 things you can do each day. 

 

5. PARTY LESS (KIND OF)

Building a better future comes with sacrifice. If you're, let's say, partying 3 times every week, cut it down to once per week and plug the cash you'll be saving into your brand new business fund. This will also free up to extra evenings per week so that you can start hustling. 

A lot of entrepreneurs often talk about staying in all the time when their friends are out eating at restaurants and sipping cocktails in bars. But, I think you need to find a balance to make things work. Your social life is still very important, as sitting at a computer can get pretty lonely at times. So, remember to have fun, leave the house, and laugh a lot! 

entrepreneurEmily Hailstone